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Police reorganisation committee inaugurated by Vice President Sambo

On 17 February, Vice President Namadi Sambo inaugurated a committee to re-organise the Nigeria Police Force, headed by Chief Parry Osayande.

Speaking at the inauguration, VP Sambo said the task of the committee would be to “redress the rot in the Nigeria Police Force and reposition it to face the challenges of democratic society, through the timely prevention and detection of crime in all its ramifications”.

The 8-member committee was constituted on 25 January, after President Goodluck Jonathan had sacked the former Inspector General of Police, Mr Hafiz Ringim, and his six deputies, following the embarrassing escape from police custody, of a key suspect in a Christmas Day bomb incident.

Its terms of reference as follows:

1.      To identify the challenges and factors militating against effective performance in the Nigeria Police Force and make recommendations for addressing the challenges.

2.      To examine the scope and standard of training and other personnel development activities in the Police to determine their adequacy or otherwise.

3.      To determine the general and specific causes of the collapse of public confidence in the police and recommend ways of restoring public trust in the institution.

4.      To examine records of performance of Officers and Men of the Nigeria Police Force with a view to identifying those that can no longer fit into the system due to declining productivity, age, indiscipline, corruption and/or disloyalty.

5.      To make any other recommendations for the improvement of the Nigeria Police Force.

Its chairman, Osayande, 76, a former deputy inspector general of police, had been chairman of the Police Service Commission since April 2008.

This is the sixth committee on police reform set up by the Federal Government in the last 17 years. There was a Police Reform Panel in 1995, a Vision 2010 committee in 1997, the Tamuno Committee in 2002, the Danmadami Police Reform Committee in 2006, and a Presidential Committee on the Reform of the Nigeria Police Force chaired by Alhaji M. D. Yusuf in 2008.

The Yusuf Committee, of which Osayande was a member, particularly lamented that the government had failed to implement the recommendations of previous committees. As it turned out, its own recommendations were again largely ignored since 2008, leading now to the Osayande committee!

President Jonathan sets up Special Committee towards urgent reorganization of Nigerian Police Force

Mr PARRY OSAYANDE, Chairman of the Special Committee

On 25 January, President Goodluck Jonathan established a Special Committee to oversee the urgent reorganization of the Nigeria Police Force.

The committee is to be chaired by the current Chairman of the Police Service Commission (PSC), Mr. Parry B.O. Osayande, a retired Deputy Inspector General of Police.

The Committee’s other members are the following:

1.      Mr. Cashmir T. Akagbosu, AIG (rtd.), mni

2.      Mr. Bashir A. Albasu, AIG (rtd.), fwc.

3.      Major Gen. S.N. Chikwe (rtd), fwc.

4.      Professor S.D. Mukoro.

5.      Dr. Fabian Ajogwu, SAN.

6.      Aisha Larai Tukur.

7.      Solicitor General of the Federation.

8.      Permanent Secretary, SSO, Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF) who is to serve as Secretary to the Committee.

The statement further listed the committee’s terms of reference as follows:

1.      To identify the challenges and factors militating against effective performance in the Nigeria Police Force and make recommendations for addressing the challenges.

2.      To examine the scope and standard of training and other personnel development activities in the Police to determine their adequacy or otherwise.

3.      To determine the general and specific causes of the collapse of public confidence in the police and recommend ways of restoring public trust in the institution.

4.      To examine records of performance of Officers and Men of the Nigeria Police Force with a view to identifying those that can no longer fit into the system due to declining productivity, age, indiscipline, corruption and/or disloyalty.

5.      To make any other recommendations for the improvement of the Nigeria Police Force.

The statement added that the Committee’s recommendations shall be implemented along with those of previous committees set up by Government towards reforming of the Force.

Police chief Ringim cuts short US visit, following summons by Senate

Mr HAFIZ A. RINGIM Inspector General of Police

On 29 June, the Inspector-General of Police, Mr Hafiz Ringim, cut short his scheduled five-day working visit to the United States, in order to return home and honour a Senate invitation to testify on the security situation in the country.   

Ringim, who arrived Washington DC on 26 June, had held some talks with US government officials, and was scheduled to deliver a keynote address on 30 June at a conference on “The Challenge of Police Reform in Africa’’,  organised by the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). 

However, he decided to return home after the Senate, rising from its 28 June deliberations on the security incidents in the country, summoned security chiefs to brief it on the situation.

A spokesperson of the CSIS thereafter phoned the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in New York to say that the Inspector General would no longer attend the event.

The spokesperson reportedly said: “He (Ringim) called this morning (Wednesday) to inform us that he will be leaving Washington tonight to honour an invitation from the Senate on the security situation in the country’’.

IGP Hafiz Ringim in US on five-day working visit

Mr HAFIZ RINGIM Inspector General of Police

On 26 June, the Inspector-General of Police, Mr Hafiz Abubakar Ringim, arrived in Washington DC, at the start of a five-day working visit to the United States of America.

The North America correspondent of the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the Police chief is in Washington for talks with US government officials on the current security situation in Nigeria, and also as a major participamt at a conference on police reform in Africa.

The report, quoting an official at the Nigerian Embassy in Washington who craved annonymity, said: “Ringim will meet with FBI officials on Monday (27 June) and will also hold meetings with State Department officials on issues of security concern”.

On 30 June, the Police chief will deliver a keynote address at a conference on ‘The Challenge of Police Reform in Africa’, being organised by the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington.

According to the organisers of the event, Mr Ringim’s address will be titled ‘Towards an era of democratic policing in Nigeria’ and he will “discuss his efforts to turn the continent’s largest police organisation into an accountable, professional, publicly-oriented service”. The lecture will also mark the end of a year-long study into the challenges of police reform in Africa by the CSIS, an American institution which provides strategic insights and policy solutions to decision-makers in government, international institutions, the private sector and civil society.

An official at the Nigerian embassy told NAN that US assistance and cooperation was vital to the battle against terrorism in Nigeria.

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